Tucson Botanical Garden

This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (November 2014) (Learn how and when to remove this template message) Tucson Botanical Gardens is a five-and-a-half-acre collection of sixteen residentially scaled urban gardens in Tucson, Arizona, United States. Paths connect these gardens, which include a Zen Garden, a Prehistoric Garden, a Barrio Garden, a Butterfly Garden, a Xeriscape Garden, and a Children’s Garden. The Stonewall Foundation Tropical Exhibit is home to orchids, bromeliads, and jungle vegetation, along with a display of live tropical butterflies from five continents from October to April. The Cactus and Succulent Garden contains hundreds of cacti and arid plants arranged to imitate the arid Sonoran desert, and is embellished with exotic stones and minerals collected by the Gardens’ founder, Harrison Yocum. The Native Crops Garden illustrates the prehistoric agricultural practices in Central and Southern Arizona. The Tohono O’odham Path winds among edible and utilitarian plants of the Sonoran Desert. History The Tucson Botanical Gardens were founded in 1964, by horticulturist and collector Harrison G. Yocum. The gardens were originally located at his home on North Jefferson Street, and contained an extensive collection of cacti and palms open to the public. Memberships became available in 1968, and the group became chartered as a non-profit corporation the next year. After the organization grew to over 100 charter members, it moved to the Randolph Park, where it used available greenhouse display space. After growing further, the group was looking for a larger location to move the gardens to. Mrs. Bernice Porter, the owner of the grounds of the former Desert Gardens Nursery garden, was looking for a way to preserve her house and gardens from demolition. In 1974, the grounds became the new headquarters of the Tucson Botanical Gardens after the Tucson City Council passed Resolution 9384, which stated that the property could be used for the development of a botanical garden. The house has undergone extensive remodeling to allow it to be more suitable for the library and the administrative offices of the Tucson Botanical Gardens. Many rooms however, including the Porter Hall, retain the original look of the Porter family house. References ^ “Tucson Botanical Gardens”. Retrieved 2014-11-19.
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Tucson Botanical Garden

Gardens Aloe Alley Aloe Alley is a quiet and shady garden path, a favorite amongst employees. See hummingbirds flock to this area when the Aloe are flowering. Backyard Bird Garden The Backyard Bird Garden shows how to attract birds the natural way. Watch for hummingbirds, cardinals, and quail year-round. Butterfly Garden The Butterfly Garden displays a variety of seasonal plants that attract regional butterflies. Cactus & Succulent Garden The Cactus and Succulent Garden features cacti from the southwestern states, Mexico, South America and Africa, plus hardy Old and New World succulents. Children’s Discovery Garden The Children’s Discovery Garden takes you on a journey through the life cycle of a plant. Thornville Garden Railway Watch the train as it winds through a miniature town. Hear it chug and whistle as you stroll around theGardens. (Operation subject to weather and other conditions) Butterfly Greenhouse Home to Butterfly Magic, the Cox Butterfly & Orchid Pavilion, in addition to the seasonal Tropical Butterfly display, contains an impressive selection of tropical plants such as Orchids, Hibiscus, Sword Ferns and Bromeliads. Herb Garden The Herb Garden displays a rich variety of culinary, fragrance, and medicinal herbs that can be grown in Tucson. Shade Garden The Shade Garden demonstrates which regional plants thrive and are appropriate for shady spots. Historical Gardens The Historical Garden features many trees and shrubs commonly planted in Tucson during the 1930s, 40s and 50s – including olive, myrtle, and dwarf citrus. Iris Garden Don’t miss the Iris Garden in April when it’s in full bloom.  You will see a spectacular display of color and a wide variety of bearded iris. Nuestro Jardin (Barrio Garden) Nuestro Jardin honors Tucson’s traditional Mexican-American neighborhood gardens with a charming and colorful display of flowers, trees, herbs, and objects commonly seen in barrio gardens. Wildflower Garden The Wildflower Garden features a variety of southwest annuals and perennials such as, Penstemon, lupine, Mexican gold poppy, desert marigold and owl’s clover, which are in bloom during spring. In the summer the space is graced with Mexican hat and chocolate flower. Zen Garden The Zen Garden is a quiet haven for reflection and peaceful contemplation. Xeriscape Garden The Xeriscape Garden demonstrates  a beautiful, lush and low-water-use landscape, perfect for any Tucson backyard. Native American Crops Garden The Native Crops Garden displays traditional crops from the southwestern U.S. and Mexico with an emphasis on plants grown by the Tohono O’odham. Plants of the Tohono O’odham Path Plants of the Tohono O’odham path honors the relationship between native peoples and the plants of the Sonoran Desert.
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Tucson Botanical Garden

Commercial Photography Personal photos are allowed throughout the Gardens. Commercial use of photographs are prohibited without the full written consent of Tucson Botanical Gardens. Photo shoots may be arranged by calling 520.326.9686 x29 or emailing [email protected] During your visit you may be filmed, videotaped or photographed by Tucson Botanical Gardens employees or contracted professional. Your admission to the Gardens serves as permission for use of your image by Tucson Botanical Gardens. Garden Etiquette The Gardens is a living museum. For its protection and the enjoyment of others, please follow these simple guidelines: Stay on the maintained paths. Do not climb on trees, walls, sculptures or foundations. Smell the flowers but do not collect any plants or plant materials. Pets are not permitted except for service animals. The exception is our Dog Days of Summer (June – September). PLEASE DO NOT leave pets in your vehicle. No Soliciting. The Gardens is a non-smoking facility, this includes e-cigarettes. The Tucson Botanical Gardens values and appreciates feedback from visitors.  Although we may not be able to respond to individual comments and inquiries, all feedback is reviewed by senior management and taken into account in our strategic and planning processes.
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Tucson Botanical Garden

After growing further, the group was looking for a larger location to move the gardens to. Mrs. Bernice Porter, the owner of the grounds of the former Desert Gardens Nursery garden, was looking for a way to preserve her house and gardens from demolition. In 1974, the grounds became the new headquarters of the Tucson Botanical Gardens after the Tucson City Council passed Resolution 9384, which stated that the property could be used for the development of a botanical garden.
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Tucson Botanical Garden

Frida Kahlo: Art, Garden, Life Oct. 10 – May 31 Included with admission. Tucson Botanical Gardens was selected as the only institution to receive this extraordinary exhibition designed by one of the world’s premier botanical gardens, the New York Botanical Garden.  There will be lectures, photography, poetry, food and music, all centered on the central theme of Frida Kahlo and her powerful work and influence… Read More
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Tucson Botanical Garden

“My background was in arts,” Conklin says. “Before my first visit to a botanical garden, I was like, ‘Why would I want to go to a botanical garden? I would rather go see a play or do this or that.’ Then I stepped foot into the garden and I understood that everything is connected: art, music, science, biology, ecology. Botanical gardens bring everything together under one sky.”
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Tucson Botanical Garden

Garden Etiquette The Gardens is a living museum. For its protection and the enjoyment of others, please follow these simple guidelines: Stay on the maintained paths. Do not climb on trees, walls, sculptures or foundations. Smell the flowers but do not collect any plants or plant materials. Pets are not permitted except for service animals. The exception is our Dog Days of Summer (June – September). PLEASE DO NOT leave pets in your vehicle. No Soliciting. The Gardens is a non-smoking facility, this includes e-cigarettes. The Tucson Botanical Gardens values and appreciates feedback from visitors.  Although we may not be able to respond to individual comments and inquiries, all feedback is reviewed by senior management and taken into account in our strategic and planning processes.
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Tucson Botanical Garden

It was first developed and displayed at the New York Botanical Gardens in the Bronx, New York, and became a blockbuster. In September of last year, Michelle Conklin, executive director of the TBG, received a call from a colleague at the New York gardens. New York’s grant for the exhibit included money for another small garden to show it. Would Conklin be interested in bringing the Frida show to Tucson?
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“We felt that since our community is so diverse and has such a strong Mexican-American population, we wanted to do more than (the New York Botanical Gardens) did when it came to really celebrating the culture of Mexico,” Conklin says. “It feels like this exhibit was meant to be in Tucson and meant to be in our garden.”
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Select Friday Evenings: Jan. 27, Feb. 24, Mar. 24, Apr. 28, May 26 5 – 8 p.m. Now that Frida Fridays are a permanent part of the Tucson Botanical Gardens’ schedule, it’s only appropriate that once a month, we celebrate Frida in a major way!  Starting Jan. 27, and continuing on the fourth Friday of every month, the Gardens will be the center of all things Frida Kahlo.  There will be performances, food and festive refreshments that bring Frida Kahlo’s…

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