Paint Bathroom Vanity

Are you looking at your bathroom vanity thinking it has only one place to go — the trash? Well, think again. Learn how to save that dated vanity and make it look like new without spending much money. Related Article How to Make a DIY Bathroom Mirror FrameDoes your bathroom need a life buoy to save it from a bygone era? Prep your bathroom cabinet for paintTo get a flawless finish on your paint job, spend some time prepping the cabinet for paint. Begin by cleaning the surface with a mild cleanser to remove any toothpaste splatters and greasy fingerprints. Here's the vanity before I started updating it. (Photo courtesy of Brittany Bailey/Pretty Handy Girl) Remove the doors from the vanity to give you easier access for painting. Photo courtesy of Brittany Bailey/Pretty Handy Girl Remove hinges and knobs. Photo courtesy of Brittany Bailey/Pretty Handy Girl Store hardware in a zip-close bag to prevent tiny screws and parts from being lost. Photo courtesy of Brittany Bailey/Pretty Handy Girl Look over the vanity for scratches, gouges and holes. Fill them with wood putty and allow it to harden. Photo courtesy of Brittany Bailey/Pretty Handy Girl Sand the repaired areas smooth. Lightly sand the rest of the vanity to give it some “tooth” for the paint to stick to. There’s no need to completely sand the existing finish off. Photo courtesy of Brittany Bailey/Pretty Handy Girl Wipe off any sanding dust with a damp rag. Photo courtesy of Brittany Bailey/Pretty Handy Girl Paint your bathroom cabinetYou can use one of three types of paint on your vanity: oil-based, latex or chalk-finish paint.  If you use an oil-based or latex paint, you'll need to use a primer first. (Photo courtesy of Brittany Bailey/Pretty Handy Girl) In the past, an oil-based paint was usually preferred for cabinets in the bathroom or kitchen because of excellent leveling properties and a hard finish that was resistant to chipping. Unfortunately, oil paint has a strong odor and is harder to clean up. Luckily, improvements to latex paints have made them almost as durable as oil paint. Latex (water-based) paints made for doors, windows and trim are a good choice for cabinets. This type of paint has an added hardener and excellent leveling properties. Both latex and oil paint require a coat of primer on your vanity before painting. A third option is to use chalk-finish paint. Many furniture painters like the ease of painting with chalk-finish paint because it doesn’t require a primer coat first. There are many chalk-finish paint brands available on the market today.  Related Article Painting Furniture with Chalk PaintTake do-it-yourself furniture painting to a new level with Annie Sloan Chalk Paint. If using latex or oil paint, prime your vanity. If you are using a chalk paint, go straight to painting. Follow the wood grain of the cabinet when applying paint. Photo courtesy of Brittany Bailey/Pretty Handy Girl Allow to dry, and then add a second coat of paint. Chalk paint enthusiasts like the matte, buttery finish of a furniture wax applied over the paint. Use a wax brush to apply furniture wax in circular motions onto the vanity. Photo courtesy of Brittany Bailey/Pretty Handy Girl Wait a minute and buff off any excess wax with a clean, dry rag. Apply a second coat of wax if the finish feels dry and chalky. Photo courtesy of Brittany Bailey/Pretty Handy Girl You may choose to apply a polycrylic coat for a more maintenance-free finish. That’s up to you and the users of the bathroom. (Have small kids that are rough on your home? Opt for the polycrylic.) Replace dated knobs and hinges if desired. Photo courtesy of Brittany Bailey/Pretty Handy Girl Now, about that countertop and faucet. Do you need to trash those? If so, I give you permission. You can purchase new ones at your local home improvement store. Here's my finished project! (Photo courtesy of Brittany Bailey/Pretty Handy Girl) Enjoy your newly saved vanity! Aren’t you glad you didn’t throw it away? Ready to update your bathroom vanity? Feel free to ask any questions in the comments section below.   Are you a DIY expert? Do you have your own blog or website to prove it? Contact us to learn more about blogging opportunities with Angie’s List.
paint bathroom vanity 1

Paint Bathroom Vanity

Well, think again. Learn how to save that dated vanity and make it look like new without spending much money. Related Article How to Make a DIY Bathroom Mirror FrameDoes your bathroom need a life buoy to save it from a bygone era? Prep your bathroom cabinet for paintTo get a flawless finish on your paint job, spend some time prepping the cabinet for paint. Begin by cleaning the surface with a mild cleanser to remove any toothpaste splatters and greasy fingerprints. Here's the vanity before I started updating it. (Photo courtesy of Brittany Bailey/Pretty Handy Girl) Remove the doors from the vanity to give you easier access for painting. Photo courtesy of Brittany Bailey/Pretty Handy Girl Remove hinges and knobs. Photo courtesy of Brittany Bailey/Pretty Handy Girl Store hardware in a zip-close bag to prevent tiny screws and parts from being lost. Photo courtesy of Brittany Bailey/Pretty Handy Girl Look over the vanity for scratches, gouges and holes. Fill them with wood putty and allow it to harden. Photo courtesy of Brittany Bailey/Pretty Handy Girl Sand the repaired areas smooth. Lightly sand the rest of the vanity to give it some “tooth” for the paint to stick to. There’s no need to completely sand the existing finish off. Photo courtesy of Brittany Bailey/Pretty Handy Girl Wipe off any sanding dust with a damp rag. Photo courtesy of Brittany Bailey/Pretty Handy Girl Paint your bathroom cabinetYou can use one of three types of paint on your vanity: oil-based, latex or chalk-finish paint.  If you use an oil-based or latex paint, you'll need to use a primer first. (Photo courtesy of Brittany Bailey/Pretty Handy Girl) In the past, an oil-based paint was usually preferred for cabinets in the bathroom or kitchen because of excellent leveling properties and a hard finish that was resistant to chipping. Unfortunately, oil paint has a strong odor and is harder to clean up. Luckily, improvements to latex paints have made them almost as durable as oil paint. Latex (water-based) paints made for doors, windows and trim are a good choice for cabinets. This type of paint has an added hardener and excellent leveling properties. Both latex and oil paint require a coat of primer on your vanity before painting. A third option is to use chalk-finish paint. Many furniture painters like the ease of painting with chalk-finish paint because it doesn’t require a primer coat first. There are many chalk-finish paint brands available on the market today.  Related Article Painting Furniture with Chalk PaintTake do-it-yourself furniture painting to a new level with Annie Sloan Chalk Paint. If using latex or oil paint, prime your vanity. If you are using a chalk paint, go straight to painting. Follow the wood grain of the cabinet when applying paint. Photo courtesy of Brittany Bailey/Pretty Handy Girl Allow to dry, and then add a second coat of paint. Chalk paint enthusiasts like the matte, buttery finish of a furniture wax applied over the paint. Use a wax brush to apply furniture wax in circular motions onto the vanity. Photo courtesy of Brittany Bailey/Pretty Handy Girl Wait a minute and buff off any excess wax with a clean, dry rag. Apply a second coat of wax if the finish feels dry and chalky. Photo courtesy of Brittany Bailey/Pretty Handy Girl You may choose to apply a polycrylic coat for a more maintenance-free finish. That’s up to you and the users of the bathroom. (Have small kids that are rough on your home? Opt for the polycrylic.) Replace dated knobs and hinges if desired. Photo courtesy of Brittany Bailey/Pretty Handy Girl Now, about that countertop and faucet. Do you need to trash those? If so, I give you permission. You can purchase new ones at your local home improvement store. Here's my finished project! (Photo courtesy of Brittany Bailey/Pretty Handy Girl) Enjoy your newly saved vanity! Aren’t you glad you didn’t throw it away? Ready to update your bathroom vanity? Feel free to ask any questions in the comments section below.   Are you a DIY expert? Do you have your own blog or website to prove it? Contact us to learn more about blogging opportunities with Angie’s List.
paint bathroom vanity 2

Paint Bathroom Vanity

Instructions Follow these instructions whether you’re refinishing an existing vanity or painting the bare wood of a new, unfinished vanity. Because you’ll need to remove the doors and hardware from an existing vanity, this is a good time to upgrade the knobs and pulls. For a complete makeover add a new vanity top, sink, faucet, and backsplash. Prep the Vanity for Painting Step 1 Remove the cabinet doors, drawers, false drawer fronts, and any attached hardware. If you plan to replace the vanity top and sink, remove these as well for easier access and less masking later. If the cabinet has working drawers, remove them from the cabinet. Then unscrew the drawer fronts, where possible, and finish them separately. Good to KnowIf you want to replace the cabinet knobs and pulls but the new hardware won’t fit the old holes, now’s the time to fill the existing holes with wood putty and sand smooth before priming. Step 2 Using trisodium phosphate (TSP) cleaner and a scrubbing pad or sponge, thoroughly wash all surfaces to be painted. Then rinse at least twice with fresh water and a sponge. Good to KnowIf rubber cabinet bumpers you peel or scrape off leave behind an adhesive residue, remove it with mineral spirits while working in a well-ventilated area. Then wash the areas with TSP. Step 3 For wood surfaces protected by a clear finish, sand with 220-grit sandpaper to remove any gloss. Reach into the inside corners of the cabinet panels and recesses of any moulding. Step 4 For previously painted surfaces, remove any loose or damaged paint. Sand to feather the edges of the paint with the bare wood and apply a latex primer to the bare spots. Step 5 For melamine or thermofoil-covered surfaces, common on cabinet sides and some doors, check that the plastic film is firmly bonded to the material underneath. If not, consider removing all of the film by using a heat gun to loosen the remaining adhesive. After the film is gone, use a rag with alcohol or mineral spirits to wipe off the adhesive. If the film is firmly bonded to the backing, sand it lightly with 220-grit sandpaper just until the surface becomes dull. Good to KnowSome film surfaces may be loosened by the primer you use. Check them carefully as you work and after the first coat of primer dries. Step 6 For all surfaces, vacuum any sanding dust and wipe the surfaces clean with a soft damp cloth. Step 7 Use painter’s tape to mask off the underside of the vanity top, adjoining walls, floor, and the inside face of the cabinet frame. Prime the Surfaces for Painting Step 1 Even if you plan to apply a combination paint and primer, a dedicated primer may be necessary to overcome problems with the vanity surfaces. For sanded bare wood and painted surfaces, apply an even coat of primer and sand smooth. If you notice any dings or surface damage, patch them with putty, sand smooth, and apply primer to the spots. Good to KnowThe glossier the paint you plan to apply, the smoother you need to make the primed surface. Flat finishes will hide small surface imperfections, but a gloss finish enhances them. Step 2 For thermofoil and melamine surfaces — even after sanding — you’ll need the stickiness of a shellac-based primer. Brush or roll on two coats and check for loose film. Good to KnowMatch the brush to the primer you use. For example, latex primer (and paint) is best applied using a synthetic-bristle brush. A shellac-based or oil-based primer should be applied using a fine natural-bristle brush. For the smoothest finish, buy the best quality brush you can afford. Step 3 After the first coat of primer, sand lightly and wipe the surfaces clean. Apply a second coat of primer as needed and let dry overnight. Paint and Reassemble the Vanity Step 1 Brush or roll on the first coat of paint and let dry. Then add two additional coats to protect the surfaces from daily use. Remove the tape, let the third coat dry overnight, and reassemble the vanity. Good to KnowOn a raised-panel cabinet door, notice that the panel is loose within the frame (even if it doesn’t move when you touch it). That allows the wood to shrink and swell with seasonal humidity changes. When painting panels, use the tip of your brush to force paint into the tiny gap between the panel and frame. Otherwise, the panel will expose an unpainted strip when it shrinks. Step 2 Drill holes in the cabinet doors and drawers as needed for new hardware. Then screw the drawer pulls and door handles in position. Step 3 Reinstall the door hinges and loosely fasten the door to the cabinet frame. For two facing doors, adjust the door positions using the hinges until the adjoining door frame edges are even; then tighten the screws. Good to KnowGot a mounting screw that won’t tighten or constantly comes loose? Apply wood glue to a wooden toothpick or match and insert it into the hole. Break off the surplus portion of the wood and allow the glue to dry for an hour. Then insert the screw as you normally would. Step 4 If you removed the drawer fronts or false fronts for finishing, reattach them to the drawer boxes and cabinet. Replace the drawers and check that they slide open easily. Step 5 Add new cabinet bumpers to the doors. Then replace the countertop, sink, and faucet as needed.

Paint Bathroom Vanity

Paint Bathroom Vanity
Paint Bathroom Vanity
Paint Bathroom Vanity
Paint Bathroom Vanity

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