Outdoor Table Plans

Use these free picnic table plans to build a picnic table for your backyard, deck, or any other area around your home where you need seating. Building a picnic table is an easy task that makes the perfect weekend project without breaking the bank.The picnic table plans include plans for traditional, octagon, hexagon, round, folding, small, and large picnic tables. You'll have no trouble finding a free picnic table plan to fit your space and style.These free picnic table plans include everything you need to build a picnic table including a materials and tools list, a cut list, step-by-step written building directions, diagrams, and photos. Some of the plans even include videos and user-submitted photos.If you like these free picnic table plans, you'll also like free woodworking plans to help you build porch swings, potting benches, coffee tables, bookcases, wine racks, step stools, home bars, decks, gazebos, greenhouses, cabins, pergolas, dog houses, playhouses, swing sets, deer stands, tree houses, workbenches, router tables, sheds, Adirondack chairs, bird houses, benches, and chicken coops.
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Outdoor Table Plans

First off — I just want to say a big “thank you” for sharing the plans for this build. Sadly, as I was building it today, I hoped for a bit more clarification on a few things. I have just completed the table but I thought it might be helpful for others in the future.1 – I wished there was something mentioning that the center supports for the legs (2×6 and 2×4) should be at a right angle with the actual (making them flat instead of angled like the boards they connect to). When I built the legs, I made the center supports flush with the legs and didn’t realize til later (while attaching the long support at the end of the project) that they weren’t supposed to be that way. It caused a bit of a “problem” because while attaching the stretcher 2×4 at the end that stretches the length of the table, it wouldn’t connect flush. I had to actually miter the edges to make them sit flush.Sorry, I hope this is making sense. It is late and my preggo brain can’t seem to construct a proper sentence.2 – The distance between the boards on top doesn’t work out to be 2″. Those building this table will probably have to play with the distances between the boards.3 – I have a Kreg Jig and use it frequently but those 45 degree mitered angles were a bit awkward to use in the Kreg Jig. I did eventually wing it and get a couple holes in there but a few images or a video might be really helpful. I was surprised at how difficult it was to try to find someone online that had a video or images of how to do this properly.4 – Since the gaps between my boards were 1 1/2 – 2″ in the center of the table (I made them closer together on the pieces connecting to the frame), the support pieces that connects to the table top and the legs, was a beast to screw in. The gap ran right down the middle meaning there wasn’t much room on either side of the board to attach the screws without running the risk of splitting the wood. Also, I had to put the screws in at an angle to make them work. I noticed in the actual tutorial, you used a 2×6 for this piece but the plans call for a 2×4. I think the 2×6 would actually work better. I would have swapped it out but I had already cut all of the lumber and didn’t happen to have an additional piece of 2×6 long enough.5 – You did mention this in your actual tutorial but I think it is worth mentioning on the plans too — I HIGHLY recommend who ever builds this in the future to NOT cut the X pieces or the stretcher until everything else is assembled. The plan called for the stretcher to be 57 3/4″. I don’t know how it worked out to be so but my stretched ended up being 62″ long. And the X pieces were definitely trial-and-error. I think I ended up cutting mine about an inch longer than the actual plan called for.6 – For the actual table top, I found myself wishing that the plan had called for pocket holes on the ENDS of the 2×6 pieces that connect to the long side of the “frame” as well as along the length. When I connected the middle 4 boards with pocket hole screws, it joint was nice and tight. The two boards along the frame had small gaps in the ends where the end met the table. The gaps aren’t large but I think if I were to do it again, I would add pocket holes to the ends of those outside boards as well as along the length.7 – The last thing, I promise. On the plan, there is not mention of how far from the sides any thing should be connected. For example — when attaching the legs to the table, I wished that I had a “distance from the edge” measurement. The same goes with the connector boards. It would have saved a lot of time to know how far from the sides of the table for the 2×4 and how far from the outside of the legs for the final stretcher.I hope this isn’t taken as me putting “down” the plan and tutorial. I had a lot of fun building the table. I just wanted to let others know little pitfalls that they may encounter along the way.
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Outdoor Table Plans

Just a quick tip – for outdoor tables, stain all boards before assembly. This will help ward off any warping and mold. Also, when you are laying the boards across the top of the table, make sure the grain on the board alternates up and down. By looking at the end of the board, you will see he grain direction in the shape of a “u”. The “u” can be up for the first table-top board, and down for the second. This will help your table stay relatively flat as the boards expand in the wet and the sun. I learned all this the hard way after making my first outdoor table (not with Ana’s plans). Great plans – I LOVE YOUR SITE!
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Outdoor Table Plans

Over 100 Free Outdoor Woodcraft Plans at AllCrafts.net Free plans for all kinds of outdoor woodworking projects. Arbors, chairs, patio furniture, benches, gardening tables, outdoor storage and much more!
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Outdoor Table Plans

I’m sure you’ve probably built (or not built) your table by now, but just wanted to chime in. I built a larger table (12 ft.) using these plans, and I just didn’t connect the table top to the base, allowing me to separate the two. Because of the weight of the top, I’m not worried about it flipping off, I just placed some braces inside/underneath the top, so that when it’s sitting correctly on the base, it won’t slide. This way, moving the table is much easier.
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Outdoor Table Plans

3 Traditional 6 Foot Picnic Table Plan from Bob’s Plans Corrina Joel / EyeEm / Getty Images Here's a free picnic table for a 6-foot long traditional picnic table. All you'll need is a saw, drill, screwdriver, wrench, and lumber.This 14-page picnic table plan will provides you with a materials list, written instructions, and lots of diagrams. More
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Outdoor Table Plans

The picnic table plans include plans for traditional, octagon, hexagon, round, folding, small, and large picnic tables. You'll have no trouble finding a free picnic table plan to fit your space and style.
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Outdoor Table Plans

These free picnic table plans include everything you need to build a picnic table including a materials and tools list, a cut list, step-by-step written building directions, diagrams, and photos. Some of the plans even include videos and user-submitted photos.
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8 Wayne of Woods Free Outdoor Picnic Table Plan Monty Rakusen/Cultura RM / Getty Images Here's a free picnic table plan from Wayne of Woods that will give you a nicely finished picnic table you can leave unfinished, stain, or paint.There are plenty of pictures and step-by-step instructions to make sure that this picnic table turns out just how you'd like it to. More
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Once the perimeter of the table top is in place, cut the rest of the internal boards for the top.  These boards will be 28.5” long, and you will need 10 of them.  These are also made from a 5/4×6 piece of cedar decking that has been ripped down to 5” wide in order to get sharp, square edges.  Since you will be cutting 10 of these and you want them to be exactly the same length, it might help to set up a workstop on your table saw crosscut sled or on you miter table stand.  Note that there is a ¼” gap between each of the boards.  This will allow rain to drain through the table rather than to pool on top.  This will also help the table to look great over time, even if the boards shrink.

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